What is a LOW CARB/HIGH FAT Way of Life??

ketogenic

The basic premise of a low carb/high fat way of life is to make your primary fuel source fat, and not “healthy whole-grains”.

Carbohydrates elevate blood sugar, which in turn, increases the hormone insulin and fat is stored.

By keeping your blood sugar low, insulin will not be produced and your body will then look for fat as a primary fuel source.

The best way to determine what your daily intake of fat, protein, and carbohydrates is to count everything you ingest. This may be time consuming, difficult, and cumbersome, but you will be surprised how many carbs are in the foods the “experts” have deemed “healthy”.

I use MyfitnessPal which is a phone app or online tool.

You should be aiming for:

70-80% fat
10-20% protein (1 mg/kg body weight)
5-10% carbs

The lower your carb count, the quicker your body will become fat adapted and start burning fat.

When the body cannot find sugar to burn, your fat stores are utilized for energy and burned in the process.

9 thoughts on “What is a LOW CARB/HIGH FAT Way of Life??

  1. Wondering how much room there is for vegetables, given such a high fat content. In your opinion, what % of foods should be vegetables, for good digestion and bowel health? Thanks, Martin.

    • Remember, the high fat content is a percentage of what I am eating. There is plenty of room, space, and opportunity for vegetables. I consume ALL of my carbs from real food, like leafy green vegetables and things like carrots, broccoli, lettuce, etc.

      The key to a ketogenic way of life is to consume fat so your body can become metabolically efficient to burn ketones for fuel and not sugar.

      Fat is not the enemy. Your body needs the fat to properly function.

  2. I’m a little confused by the protein % you show. So if I weight 180 (female), how many grams of protein should I be consuming?

    • about 70-80 grams of protein. It comes out to roughly 1 mg/kg body weight.

      High protein is converted into glucose in your body. Moderate protein and HIGH fat is the key. And carbs less than 50 gm/day for weight loss.

  3. I have just started adapting a ketogenic lifestyle. I am a runner and am very interested in the benefits this type of diet can have for my fitness goals. I feel great but noticed that when I went for my run yesterday how SLUGGiSH I felt running. I was really having to push myself where I didn’t have to before…is this because my body is trying to adjust to the difference of burning fats vs carbs/sugars?? Is this “keto adaptation” that I have read about? How long does this last and how do I facilitate this transition? Any recommendations?
    Thanks!
    -gina

    • There is definitely an adaptation that comes with eliminating carbohydrates as a main source of fuel. In about 30% of individuals, the first week to 10 days will make you feel tired, irritable, and dehydrated. First, carbohydrates retain water so it is important to increase your fluid and ADD salt. Yes, you read that correctly. One of the effects of insulin on the kidneys is to retain sodium, therefore a lower blood sugar keeps insulin at bay and the loss of sodium from your kidneys.

      Second, there is a neural effect from the elimination of carbs and wheat products from you diet. We all crave sugar and there is a natural withdrawal effect from the elimination similar to tobacco, alcohol, and other drugs.

      The longer you maintain a low carb lifestyle, the easier it becomes.

      Remember to add appropriate fat to your diet as your body will be looking for fuel as you exercise.

      My fuel of choice is the bulletproof coffee with butter and MCT oil (coconut oil).

      It acts like rocket fuel before an endurance event.

  4. Hi. Gina Maday told me about this, but I’m wondering if this is possible for a vegetarian. I mainly just avoid pork, chicken, and red meet. I occasionally eat fish. I’ve noticed that since I’ve become vegetarian, I eat a lot of pasta. Now, Gina states that may not be great. I am a long distance runner. Please advise. – Jennie Bergen

    • Fish is a great way to get your protein. You can choose different varieties and have a different meal everyday. In addition, eggs and soy are another method to increasing your protein, however, soy may be inflammatory in many individuals.

      Being a vegetarian is a great way to adopt the low carb lifestyle. The key is eliminate grains and wheat.

      Look at some of the sites I link to under meal plans. There are plenty of vegetarian options to satisfy you.

      Let me know how else to help.

      Do NOT be scared of ingesting more fat in your diet.

      smc

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What is a LOW CARB/HIGH FAT Way of Life??

ketogenic

The basic premise of a low carb/high fat way of life is to make your primary fuel source fat, and not “healthy whole-grains”.

Carbohydrates elevate blood sugar, which in turn, increases the hormone insulin and fat is stored.

By keeping your blood sugar low, insulin will not be produced and your body will then look for fat as a primary fuel source.

The best way to determine what your daily intake of fat, protein, and carbohydrates is to count everything you ingest. This may be time consuming, difficult, and cumbersome, but you will be surprised how many carbs are in the foods the “experts” have deemed “healthy”.

I use MyfitnessPal which is a phone app or online tool.

You should be aiming for:

70-80% fat
10-20% protein (1 mg/kg body weight)
5-10% carbs

The lower your carb count, the quicker your body will become fat adapted and start burning fat.

When the body cannot find sugar to burn, your fat stores are utilized for energy and burned in the process.

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